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King Yin Lei Mansion Open Days 2017

King Yin Lei - Hong KongThe historic King Yin Lei Mansion at Stubbs Road, Mid-levels, Hong Kong will open its door to the public this September and October 2017. Declared a monument by the Antiquities and Monuments Office in 2008 for its historical significance and architectural importance, King Yin Lei was one of the first mansions that were built along the hillside of Hong Kong Island, which symbolize the rising status and growing wealth of the Chinese community in Hong Kong. It also contributed in establishing the Mid-Levels as an upper-class residential enclave.

Members of the public can visit the mansion free of charge on the 23rd and 24th of September and 21st and 22nd of October at the following hours:

  • 9:30am to 11am
  • 11am to 12:30pm
  • 2pm to 3:30pm
  • 3:30pm to 5pm

Only visitors with admission tickets will be allowed entry during the four public open days. Tickets will be available on September 2nd and 3rd in the following venues and times:

  • Hong Kong Heritage Discovery Centre, Kowloon Park, Haiphong Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon (from 10am to 6pm)
  • Museum of Tea Ware, Hong Kong Park, 10 Cotton Tree Drive, Central, Hong Kong (from 10am to 5pm)
  • Hong Kong Heritage Museum, 1 Man Lam Road, Sha Tin, New Territories (from 10am to 6pm)
  • Remaining tickets will be available at the Hong Kong Heritage Discovery Centre starting September 4th from 10am to 7pm.

Ticket distribution will be on a first-come, first-served basis. Each person can only obtain a maximum of four tickets for any of the visit sessions.

King Yin Lei was designed by British architect A.R. Fenton-Rayen and was completed in 1937. with its iconic red bricks, green roof tiles and unique Chinese Renaissance architecture, the mansion eventually became an iconic landmark and popular spot for taking photographs. It has also been featured in several international films such as "Soldier of Fortune" (1955) and "Enter the Dragon" (1973) as well as in several locally produced television series.

Photo credit: heritage.gov.hk

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